Karjakin – Kamsky, Corus 2006

White:
Sergey Karjakin (2660)
Black:
Gata Kamsky (2686)
Opening
Sicilian Kan
Tournament
Corus 2006, Wijk aan Zee, Round 3
Date
15/01/2006
ECO Code
B42
Result
1-0

1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 e6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 a6 5. Bd3 Nf6 6. O-O d6 7. c4 g6 8. Nc3 Bg7 9. Be3 O-O 10. Rc1
Its unusual to see the Kan / Maroczy Sicilian at a super GM level. We need to go back to the seventies to see any top level players adopting it as Black.
10… Nbd7
This move has been tested in a number of normal Grandmaster games, but nothing at a 2600 or higher level. 10… b6 is the older continuation:

  • 11. Qe2 Bb7 12. Rfd1 Nbd7 13. f3 (13. Bb1 Qc7 14. f3 Rac8 15. b3 Qb8 16. Qd2 Rfd8 17. Nde2 Bf8 18. Bh6 Be7 19. Nd4 Ba8 20. Re1 Re8 21. Kh1 Rc5 22. Be3 +/= Timman – Huebner, Tilburg 1977, 1-0 (40)) 13… Re8 14. Qf2 Rc8 15. Bf1 Qc7 16. Ndb5 axb5 17. Nxb5 Qb8 18. Nxd6 Bc6 19. b3 Bf8 20. Nxe8 Rxe8 21. Qd2 Browne – Petrosian, Milan 1975, 1/2 (21)
  • 11. b4 Bb7 12. f4 e5 13. fxe5 dxe5 14. Nc2 Ng4 15. Qxg4 Qxd3 16. Nd5 Bxd5 17. cxd5 f5 18. exf5 gxf5 19. Qg3 Nd7 20. Ne1 Spassky – Najdorf, Buenos Aires 1979, 1/2 (20)
  • 11. f3 Bb7 12. Qd2 Nbd7 13. Rfd1 Rc8 14. Bf1 Ne5 15. Na4 d5 16. exd5 exd5 17. c5 b5 18. Nb6 Rc7 19. b3 Re8 20. Bg5 Qe7 21. c6 Qd6 22. Bxb5 Rd8 23. Qa5 axb5 24. Nxb5 +- Malakhov – Iordachescu, Porto San Giorgio 1999, 1-0 (38)
  • 11. Qd2 Bb7 12. Bh6 Nbd7 13. Bxg7 Kxg7 14. Bb1 Qc7 15. b3 Rfe8 Ivanov – Gulko, Moscow 2004/2005, 1/2 (15)
11. Qd2 Qc7 12. f3 b6 13. Rfd1 Bb7 14. Bf1
Unblocking the d-file. White’s plan is to gradually lock down all of Black’s natural pawn breaks forcing him into passivity, and then break wherever he pleases – kingside, queenside, in the centre or a combination of these options.
14… Rfc8 15. b4
Both to take away the c5 square as an outpost for a black knight and as a preparation for b4-b5 or c4-c5 – whichever suits the White position.
15… Bf8
Black’s d6-pawn is weak, it needs a bit of protection. This move does that and also introduces the threat of …d5, with the idea of …Bxb4 pinning the rather active White knight.
16. a3 Rab8 17. Kh1 Qd8 18. Qf2
White’s pressure on the Black queenside is building.
18… Ne5
A decent square for the knight, White can’t immediately chase it away.
19. Na4 +/- Nfd7 20. Nb3
White prepares c5
20… Ba8 21. Nb2 Rc7 22. Na4 Rcc8 23. Bd4 +/= Rc6?
Position after 23... Rc6 23… Bh6
24. c5! +/- bxc5 25. Naxc5 Nxc5
25… Rxc5 26. Nxc5
26. Nxc5
26. bxc5?! Nd7 (26… Rxb3 is worse 27. Bxe5 Qc8 28. Bxd6 +/-) 27. Qa2 Bh6 =
26… Qc8 27. Qe3 Bb7 28. Bxe5 dxe5 29. Nd7
White’s knight is irresistable, creating mass confusion in the Black ranks.
29… Rxc1 30. Qxc1 Ra8 31. Nb6 Qxc1 32. Rxc1 Rd8
Kamsky lost on time. He can’t prevent Rc7, and his light-squared bishop is dominated by the White pawn structure and pieces.
1-0
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